Loading...

Carers


Introduction

Unpaid carers provide critical support for people with health and social care needs. The majority of recipients of unpaid care are older parents or spouses and partners and changes in the make-up of our population indicate that the number of dependent older people in the UK will increase by 113% by 2051 [1]. Supporting those who provide unpaid care to older people is therefore hugely important, and evidence is needed on how best to do this. The support provided by carers is often physically and emotionally demanding, with consequences for carers’ own health and wellbeing [2].

Data Overview

According to the 2021 Census, 9.1% of Oldham's population (aged 5 and over) provide some level of unpaid care. This includes any person providing unpaid care to family members, friends or partners who have an illness, disability or frailty and require support. Findings show Oldham's percentage of carers is similar to England for those providing over 20 hours of care and lower for those providing 19 hours or less per week. Oldham has the fourth lowest rate of unpaid care across Greater Manchester. Large variation exists across Oldham. 

Exploring the data for any unpaid by ward, Crompton, Failsworth East and Royton South have the highest percentage of residents providing unpaid care. This could be in part due to the older demographic of these wards. Coldhurst, Werneth and St. Mary's have the lowest rate. Findings are vastly different for residents providing 50 or more hours of unpaid care a week. Waterhead, Failsworth West and Coldhurst have the highest rates, whilst Failsworth East, Royton South and Royton North have the highest.

Figure 1: Percentage of population providing unpaid careSource: Nomis, Census 2021

Figure 2: Percentage of population providing any unpaid care across Greater Manchester
Source: Nomis, Census 2021

Figure 3: Percentage of population who provide any unpaid care by ward
Source: Nomis, Census 2021

Figure 4: Percentage of population who provide 50 or more hours of unpaid care per week by ward
Source: Nomis, Census 2021

There is a clear link between loneliness and poor mental and physical health. A key element of the Government's vision for social care is to tackle loneliness and social isolation, supporting people to remain connected to their communities and to develop and maintain connections to their friends and family. Latest figures for 2021/22 reveal Oldham to have a considerably lower percentage of carers aged 65+ reporting they are satisfied with their level of social contact compared regional and national rates. This gap has recently developed, with figures being comparable for 2016/17 and 2018/19. Rates are trending downwards across Oldham, North West and England. Oldham has the second lowest level of social contact satisfaction across Greater Manchester and fourth lowest amongst CIPFA nearest neighbours.

Figure 5: Percentage of carers aged 65+ who have as much social contact as they would like
Source: Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) based on the Personal Social Services Survey of Adult Carers, NHS Digital 

Figure 6: Percentage of carers aged 65+ who have as much social contact as they would like across Greater Manchester
Source: Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) based on the Personal Social Services Survey of Adult Carers, NHS Digital

Figure 6: Percentage of carers aged 65+ who have as much social contact as they would like across Greater Manchester
Source: Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) based on the Personal Social Services Survey of Adult Carers, NHS Digital

Further Information & Resources

Caring as a social determinant of health: review of evidence
This Public Health England report adds to the growing evidence that unpaid caring should be considered a social determinant of health.

Supporting Adult Carers: NICE guideline [NG150]
This guideline covers support for adults (aged 18 and over) who provide unpaid care for anyone aged 16 or over with health or social care needs. It aims to improve the lives of carers by helping health and social care practitioners identify people who are caring for someone and give them the right information and support. It covers carers’ assessments, practical, emotional and social support and training, and support for carers providing end of life care.


References

[1] Storey A. Living longer: how our population is changing and why it matters. 2018 
[2] Public Health England, Caring as a social determinant of health Findings from a rapid review of reviews and analysis of the GP Patient Survey, 2021 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/caring-as-a-social-determinant-of-health-review-of-evidence 

Contact


Health and Wellbeing Board

Oldham Council

© 2024 Oldham MBC
Site design Wray Communications

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, analyse site traffic and understand where our audience is coming from. Read more.